Senator Mulroe discusses legislation to reduce premature births on the Senate floor

Legislation sponsored by State Senator John G. Mulroe (D-Chicago) that works to increase the rate of infants carried to term was recently signed into law. Senate Bill 317 allows pharmacists to administer progesterone injections, a hormone used to decrease the risk of preterm birth, to women who have a history of delivering prematurely.

“I sponsored this legislation to improve health outcomes by decreasing barriers to care,” Mulroe said. “Over 10 percent of children in Illinois are born prematurely. Something had to be done to lower that rate.”

According to the March of Dimes, the preterm birth rate in Illinois was 9.1 percent for Asian and Hispanic women, 9.4 percent for white women, and 13.6 percent for African American women in 2016. Preterm birth can cause cerebral palsy, developmental delays and vision issues, among other problems.

“It can be difficult for pregnant women to get to the doctor each week for a progesterone shot, especially if they have to travel” Mulroe said. “By allowing pharmacists to administer this medication, I hope that more women will be able to complete the regimen.”

A progesterone regimen requires pregnant women to receive a weekly shot for 20 weeks. Senate Bill 317 includes public safety precautions such as ensuring the patient has a valid prescription, notifying the physician and confirming that the pharmacist is properly trained before administering the medication.

In addition to Senate Bill 317, the governor also signed the following Mulroe-sponsored legislation into law:

  • House Bill 2957 which allows patients with chronic conditions who take two or more medications to synchronize their prescriptions such that all medications are dispensed and picked-up at the same time.
  • House Bill 3106 which consolidates security functions within the Supreme Court Marshal’s Office and provides that Illinois Supreme Court Marshals are peace officers and have the same powers as police officers and sheriffs.
  • House Bill 3874  which clarifies that no person shall operate, register or maintain registration of a motor vehicle anywhere in Illinois, including on private property, unless the vehicle is covered by a liability insurance policy.  
Category: Showcase

April is Distracted Driver awareness month

In the time it takes to look at a text message, a car traveling at 55 miles per hour will cover the length of a football field. Because a lot can happen in that time, State Senator John G. Mulroe sponsored legislation in 2013 to curb distracted driving by prohibiting the use of hand-held cell phones while operating a motor vehicle. Distracted driving includes any activity that takes a driver’s attention away from driving, including texting, operating navigation systems and eating.

The law went into effect in 2014, making driving while using a phone a ticket-able offense. Drivers are still able to use hands-free features on their phones and one-touch dialing.

“I want to remind everyone that April is distracted driver awareness month,” Mulroe said. “This is a great opportunity for parents and guardians to discuss the dangers of distracted driving with teens, who are at a higher risk of being involved in a fatal accident that involves distracted driving. Though it may seem like just a moment, a lot can happen when cars are traveling at high speeds.”

Since Mulroe’s bill went into effect, a study conducted by Cambridge Mobile Telematics found that drivers in states with laws against using hand-held devices like Illinois spent less time on their phones than in states that did not have rules against cell phone use while driving. However, the study also found that one in four drivers was using a phone within a minute before getting into an accident.

Distracted driving remains a serious concern. According to the National Highway Traffic Safety Administration, nearly 400,000 people were injured and 3,477 individuals were killed in car crashes that involved distracted drivers in 2015 alone.

Category: Showcase

Senator Mulroe on the Senate floor

 

Chicago residents may no longer be forced to drive to the suburbs for their vehicle emissions testing based on new legislation sponsored by State Senator John Mulroe (D-Chicago). After emissions test sites closed in the Chicagoland area in November, Mulroe introduced legislation to require the Illinois Environmental Protection Agency to locate vehicle emissions inspections stations within a five-mile radius of those subject to testing.

“By closing emissions testing facilities in Chicago, the Illinois Environmental Protection Agency has created an undue burden on Chicago residents to meet the emission testing requirement” Mulroe said. “Getting a vehicle’s emissions tested can already be a time-consuming task in and of itself. We should not add to that by forcing Chicagoans to driver further to fulfill this obligation.”

The Illinois Vehicle Emissions Testing Program was established by federal law to improve air quality and public health in large cities. Current state law requires emissions test sites to be located within a 12-mile radius of vehicle owners subject to testing. Cars manufactured in 1996 or later must have its emissions tested after it is 4 years old.

“The goal of the emissions testing is to reduce air pollution from vehicles,” Mulroe said. “We shouldn’t be increasing pollution by forcing individuals to drive further from their homes for testing.”

Category: Showcase

Senator Mulroe on the floor.SPRINGFIELD – Three new proposals covering Hepatitis C screenings, 3D mammograms and updating the way we approach vaccination in the state have passed the Senate. Senator John Mulroe (D-Chicago) sponsored the plans and acts as the Chairman of the Senate Committee on Public Health.

·    SB54 requires insurance agencies to cover tomosynthesis or 3D mammograms, which are more effective in diagnosing breast cancer due to the cross-sectional nature of the screening. It is also more effective at diagnosing small, hard-to-detect tumors as well as diagnosing through dense breast tissue. 3D mammograms often result in fewer callbacks and an overall less stressful screening experience for women.
·    SB661 requires healthcare providers to offer men and women considered to be at-risk for contracting or carrying Hepatitis C a one-time blood screening. Persons considered to be at-risk are born between 1945 and 1965. The bill does not prevent healthcare providers from offering the screening at any time.
·    SB1410 was drafted as a direct result of the January 2015 measles outbreak. The bill creates protections for individuals who may suffer adverse medical reactions to vaccinations as well as individuals seeking a medical or philosophical exemption. It additionally requires doctors administering exemption paperwork to explain the risks of skipping vaccinations to parents.

“Protecting the health of our state leads to greater productivity and ensures a brighter future,” Mulroe said. “These three measures are in line with that goal, and I implore the governor to keep that in mind as they cross his desk.”

All three proposals move to the governor’s desk.

Category: Showcase

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Springfield Office:
Senator 10th District
127 Capitol Building
Springfield, IL 62706
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