HB 3636 2State Senator John Mulroe (D-10th) attended a bill signing ceremony on Monday for legislation he sponsored to help the construction industry in Illinois. The new law clarifies the Mechanics Lien Act, ensuring that if a project that a contractor is working on goes under, the contractor will receive a greater share of the payment from the foreclosure proceedings.

The Mechanics Lien Act was initially established to protect those furnishing the materials and labor for construction of buildings and public improvements. A recent court case allocated a higher percentage of the proceeds to the lender than to the unpaid contractors, resulting in a lower payment to those who worked on and supplied materials for the project.

Mulroe sponsored the legislation at the request of the construction industry.  With the clarification of the Mechanics Lien Act, small-business contractors will be given a greater percentage of the proceeds from the foreclosure. The end result will encourage suppliers to continue extending credit to contractors.

The 10th District includes North West Chicago and all or parts of the following communities: Niles, Des Plaines, Rosemont, Park Ridge, Norridge, Harwood Heights, Schiller Park, Franklin Park, Elmwood Park and River Grove.

Category: News Releases

Foreclosure bill signing 2Senator John Mulroe attended a bill signing ceremony for a new abandoned property strategy that he worked closely with Senator Jacqueline Collins (D-16th) in passing. As Governor Quinn signed the bill, Mulroe acknowledged the Quinn administration, Senator Collins, housing advocates and financial institutions for working together on the proposal, which addresses the massive number of abandoned residential properties tied up in lengthy judicial proceedings.

“We all know that there is a foreclosure crisis in Illinois,” Senator Mulroe said. “Abandoned homes magnify the crisis because they decrease the value of everyone’s home. This bill accelerates the foreclosure process for abandoned homes and provides much needed resources to the communities that are forced to care for the abandoned homes.”

This legislation creates a fast-track process for foreclosures when the property in question has been abandoned, shortening the total time from more than 500 days to approximately 100 days in such cases.

The law also increases the foreclosure filing fee. The funds collected through these
means will help offset the costs incurred by the municipalities that have had to care for,
maintain and in some cases demolish the abandoned properties.

In addition, this law will provide resources to help prevent foreclosures.

Proceeds from the increased foreclosure filing fees will go toward the Foreclosure Prevention Program Fund for homeowner counseling grants, as well as and the Abandoned Residential Property Municipality Relief Fund, which will award a projected $28 million in grants to counties and municipalities to maintain, renovate or demolish abandoned properties.

Category: News Releases

Senator John Mulroe (D-Chicago) presided over his first meeting of the Senate Public Health Committee as chairman this past week.

“I am honored that the Senate President appointed me to chair the Public Health Committee,” Sen. Mulroe said. “I appreciate the faith and trust he has in me, given my short tenure in the legislature.”

The Public Health Committee hears testimony on a variety of legislation that affects the health and well being of the people of Illinois. On Tuesday, the Public Health Committee heard testimony and subsequently passed a Medicaid expansion bill out of their meeting and to the Senate for a full vote, which is expected to happen next week.

In addition to his chairmanship of the Public Health Committee, Mulroe was also appointed vice chairman of the Judiciary Committee and is a member of the Criminal Law and Insurance Committees.

Category: News Releases

Senator John Mulroe (D-Chicago) introduced new legislation making  a change to the “aggravated battery” statute in Illinois criminal law by providing that aggravated battery that causes permanent disability or disfigurement is increased to a Class 2 (rather than a Class 3) felony.  

A Class 2 felony can result in three to seven years in prison and fines up to $25,000 while Class 3 felonies carry a prison sentence of only two to five years and fines up to $25,000.

There have been a number of reports of violent aggravated attacks in and around Chicago in the last few years. Under current law, a person who gets in a fight in a public place is subject to the same charge as an offender who permanently disfigures or disables another individual.Senator Mulroe feels that defendants should be more appropriately punished for causing life-long injuries to victims.

“The punishment should fit the crime,” Sen. Mulroe said. “The punishment should not be the same for a couple of guys who get in a fight after a football game on the street and a person who causes a lifelong injury or deformities to another individual.”

The bill also states that if a vehicle is used in the commission of an aggravated battery that causes permanent disability or disfigurement, the vehicle may be seized. The legislation also forbids persons found guilty of aggravated battery involving a vehicle from receiving a school bus driver permit and mandates that the Metropolitan Transit Authority Act add this crime to the list for which they investigate prior to hiring drivers.

Category: News Releases

Working Families

eNewsletter

eNewsletter Signup
  1. First Name(*)
    Invalid Input
  2. Last Name(*)
    Invalid Input
  3. Your Email(*)
    Please let us know your email address.
 

Office Info

Springfield Office:
Senator 10th District
127 Capitol Building
Springfield, IL 62706
(217) 782-1035
(217) 782-2331 FAX
 
District Office:
5940 North Milwaukee Avenue
Chicago, IL 60646
(773) 763-3810
(773) 763-3881 FAX